pseudorealism

  surreal art

Among all the styles and genre of western art, surrealism is probably the most intriguing. Initially influenced by the ideas of Sigmund Freud, surrealism in course of time became the depiction of the absurd and the fantastic. It was typically a product of 20th century Europe, when new discoveries in the field of science was creating possibilities of new realities.

 

But surrealism was a typical European phenomenon. The people of the downtrodden colonies, where everyday existential realities were so severe, did not find any attraction for mind-fantasies and absurdities. The new ism emerging from these colonies was magic realism, where reality of everyday lives was blended with the fantasies of escape to create an illusion of happiness. Unlike Surrealism, this new style was initially adopted in the literary works of the South American writers. But Magic realist art was mostly practiced in the rich west as a result of which in art magic realism lost much of its protest flavor.

 

 

 

One of Salvador Daliís best known surrealist paintings shows clocks in the form of soft cloth in a meaningless deserted landscape.

After fifty years of the coloniesí independence, most of third world is now making steady progress. In this new era, the whole world is fast getting unified and what man faces now in any part of the world is the confusion between what is perceived as real and incomprehensible unreal. Pseudo-realism is a product of these unsure times.

Also read on ..

Magic Real Art     Pseudoreal Art      Surreal Art

Film-making and pseudorealism      Films of Aparna Sen       Films of Satyajit Ray     Films of Mrinal Sen     Films of G Aravindan    Films of Guru Dutt    Films of Raj Kapoor    Films of Shyam Benegal

Magic Realist Literature         Pseudorealism and Indian Literature 

Pseudorealism and Global politicking

 

 

Salvador Dali: The Most Famous Surrealist of All Times

Devajyoti Ray: Pseudorealist

Paul Cadmus: Magic Realism in Art

 

 

 

 

 

 

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