pseudorealism

 

ritwik ghatak

Ritwik Ghatak, a contemporary of Satyajit Ray, Raj Kapoor and Guru Dutt, was born in the year 1925 in Dhaka and later in the fifties he shifted to Kolkata(Calcutta). Before joining films as a director and an actor he tried his hands even at literature. However, he soon realized that it was not an adequate medium to reach out to the masses. 

1960’s saw the development of Ritwik Ghatak as a complete film maker. The films made during this period were Meghe Dhaka Tara, Komol Gandhar, and Subarnarekha.

Then came his epic film ‘Titas Ekti Nadir Nam’ in the 70’s based on a fisherman around the river Titash. Perhaps no other film bears the stamp of his whole approach to film-making more than this film. His last film was ‘ Jukti, Takko Aar Gaapo’ made in 1974.

Ritwik Ghatak's films had strong political messages and influenced a new generation of film makers like Adoor Gopalakrishnan, John Abraham, Mani Kaul, Kumar Sahani and Kethan Metha, the names synonymous with Indian new wave cinema.

 

Ghatak's first complete film was ‘Nagarik’(1952-53). But the film which he first released was Ajantrik in1957. What was particularly interesting about the film was that in spite of being almost a contemporary of ‘Pather Panchali’ of Satyajit Ray ,  the approach  and the treatment towards the film was completely different. The next film to follow was ‘ Bari thheke paliye’ in 1959.

 He died in the year 1975 after chronic illness.

 

Also read on ..

Magic Real Art     Pseudoreal Art      Surreal Art

Film-making and pseudorealism      Films of Aparna Sen       Films of Satyajit Ray     Films of Mrinal Sen     Films of G Aravindan    Films of Guru Dutt    Films of Raj Kapoor    Films of Shyam Benegal

Magic Realist Literature         Pseudorealism and Indian Literature 

Pseudorealism and Global politicking

 

 

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Ritwik Ghatak Poster: High Art

A Scene from Ritwik Ghatak's Film

Pseudorealism at it best: A Scene from Ghatak